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Technology is always evolving, and older technologies regularly disappear to make way for newer iterations. One such example affects phones with 3G, a wireless standard that first became available commercially in the US about 20 years ago.

One primary driver behind 3G’s demise is the move toward 5G wireless technology. With services to support everything from smart cities to connected cars—and hopes for nearly ubiquitous access and lightning-fast connectivity speeds—5G holds significant promise for forward-looking businesses.

Carriers don’t have the resources to fully support old technologies technologies in addition to new ones, making 3G the next candidate for retirement. Though the shutdown of 3G has been on the calendar for several years (COVID-19 and other issues resulted in numerous delays), it could still create headaches for businesses that haven’t yet updated their 3G-only devices. But upgrading and managing mobile device programs can be an expensive endeavor. In 2021, the average replacement cycle for smartphones in the US was 2.5 years, and that cadence is projected to shorten to just over 2.25 years by 2025. Whether your company has just a few hundred - or hundreds of thousands - of mobile devices, it’s important to control and optimize your equipment and subscription costs as wireless technology innovations continue to emerge.

Technology is always evolving, and older technologies regularly disappear to make way for newer iterations. One such example affects phones with 3G, a wireless standard that first became available commercially in the US about 20 years ago.

One primary driver behind 3G’s demise is the move toward 5G wireless technology. With services to support everything from smart cities to connected cars—and hopes for nearly ubiquitous access and lightning-fast connectivity speeds—5G holds significant promise for forward-looking businesses. Carriers don’t have the resources to fully support old technologies technologies in addition to new ones, making 3G the next candidate for retirement. Though the shutdown of 3G has been on the calendar for several years (COVID-19 and other issues resulted in numerous delays), it could still create headaches for businesses that haven’t yet updated their 3G-only devices. But upgrading and managing mobile device programs can be an expensive endeavor. In 2021, the average replacement cycle for smartphones in the US was 2.5 years, and that cadence is projected to shorten to just over 2.25 years by 2025. Whether your company has just a few hundred - or hundreds of thousands - of mobile devices, it’s important to control and optimize your equipment and subscription costs as wireless technology innovations continue to emerge.

One primary driver behind 3G’s demise is the move toward 5G wireless technology. With services to support everything from smart cities to connected cars—and hopes for nearly ubiquitous access and lightning-fast connectivity speeds—5G holds significant promise for forward-looking businesses. Carriers don’t have the resources to fully support old technologies technologies in addition to new ones, making 3G the next candidate for retirement. Though the shutdown of 3G has been on the calendar for several years (COVID-19 and other issues resulted in numerous delays), it could still create headaches for businesses that haven’t yet updated their 3G-only devices. But upgrading and managing mobile device programs can be an expensive endeavor. In 2021, the average replacement cycle for smartphones in the US was 2.5 years, and that cadence is projected to shorten to just over 2.25 years by 2025. Whether your company has just a few hundred - or hundreds of thousands - of mobile devices, it’s important to control and optimize your equipment and subscription costs as wireless technology innovations continue to emerge.